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Halibut?

Big fish cod halibut Bras

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#1 ChrisM

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Posted 14 March 2012 - 12:31 PM

Planning on trying for some Halibut in shore or in the Bras D'Or this year. I picked up some light gear (80lbs test for my surf rod/reel) (halibut spreader, weights and rigs).
Anyone have any experience trying this or any success?? Any advice or info is appreciated.
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#2 Troutflyfisher

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Posted 14 March 2012 - 06:33 PM

Planning on trying for some Halibut in shore or in the Bras D'Or this year. I picked up some light gear (80lbs test for my surf rod/reel) (halibut spreader, weights and rigs).
Anyone have any experience trying this or any success?? Any advice or info is appreciated.


Hey,

In case you were not aware, the retention limit on Atlantic Halibut is "O". Furthermore, the rec. Season is closed for Halibut. Did not want to see you find yourself in any hot water.

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#3 captain plastic

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Posted 16 March 2012 - 07:27 AM

Hey,

In case you were not aware, the retention limit on Atlantic Halibut is "O". Furthermore, the rec. Season is closed for Halibut. Did not want to see you find yourself in any hot water.

FishCop


Fishcop I had a question, if you accidentally hook into a species with a 0 limit while fishing for something else, do you have to cut your line or can you land the fish and remove your tackle before releasing?
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#4 BigGuy

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Posted 16 March 2012 - 08:26 AM

Good question, ive heard horror stories
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#5 Troutflyfisher

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Posted 16 March 2012 - 01:55 PM

My understanding is you are ok to land & release the Halibut you accidently caught while fishing for a legal groundfish (ie cod/haddock). Where you might find yourself in some trouble is if you appear to be trying to catch Halibut (i.e. have big hooks & large bait and you are fishing the bottom etc.)

FishCop

PS... approx fine for possession of Rec. caught Halibut might range from $500-$2000/fish.
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#6 captain plastic

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Posted 16 March 2012 - 03:33 PM

My understanding is you are ok to land & release the Halibut you accidently caught while fishing for a legal groundfish (ie cod/haddock). Where you might find yourself in some trouble is if you appear to be trying to catch Halibut (i.e. have big hooks & large bait and you are fishing the bottom etc.)

FishCop

PS... approx fine for possession of Rec. caught Halibut might range from $500-$2000/fish.


Makes sense, although I often fish deep with bait and large hooks for cod.
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#7 Guest

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Posted 16 March 2012 - 05:16 PM

Fish Cop. I assume you are DFO? Regardless great info that you are providing here. I fish Tidal water regularly and am interested with with you post.
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#8 Troutflyfisher

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Posted 16 March 2012 - 05:44 PM

Makes sense, although I often fish deep with bait and large hooks for cod.


Hey... yes know what your saying... just stating there are hooks sold and used for Halibut (16/0 etc)...while cod hooks are often 12/0 to 14/0... different bait works better for each as well.... there is no hard & fast method to catch just the one species... just making the point to not direct for Halibut...

best of luck cod fishing... hope someday we can once again fish for Halibut... DFO needs to issue a salt water licence so the min. size (81 cm) can be enforced. The size limit use to be in regulation and rec. anglers could retain 1 Halibut/day. Once it was changed to lic. condition- size could not longer be enforced for rec. anglers.
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#9 Troutflyfisher

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Posted 16 March 2012 - 05:44 PM

Fish Cop. I assume you are DFO? Regardless great info that you are providing here. I fish Tidal water regularly and am interested with with you post.



Yes - Fishery Officer... any ques. you have - I will try to answer.
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#10 Guest

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Posted 16 March 2012 - 05:47 PM

Yes - Fishery Officer... any ques. you have - I will try to answer.

Most excellant my friend, I for one welcome your input. Tks
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#11 Troutflyfisher

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Posted 16 March 2012 - 05:50 PM

anytime...
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#12 ppaauull0

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Posted 16 March 2012 - 07:44 PM

Yes - Fishery Officer... any ques. you have - I will try to answer.

Its great that there is someone on this site who maybe able to shed light on the very confusing regulations regarding saltwater fishing in NS. Something needs to be done to help recreational saltwater fishing in this province. Why is there a difference in the fishing season between the west and east side of Halifax Harbour. Why is there a restriction on recreational Halibut and Tuna fishing in NS, because its not conservation thats for sure.
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#13 captain plastic

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Posted 16 March 2012 - 07:50 PM

Hey... yes know what your saying... just stating there are hooks sold and used for Halibut (16/0 etc)...while cod hooks are often 12/0 to 14/0... different bait works better for each as well.... there is no hard & fast method to catch just the one species... just making the point to not direct for Halibut...

best of luck cod fishing... hope someday we can once again fish for Halibut... DFO needs to issue a salt water licence so the min. size (81 cm) can be enforced. The size limit use to be in regulation and rec. anglers could retain 1 Halibut/day. Once it was changed to lic. condition- size could not longer be enforced for rec. anglers.


I would gladly pay out the rear end for a salt water license if it meant recreational access to some of our more impressive fish. Heck I would pay just to be allowed to fish for Tuna and Halibut on a catch and release basis.
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#14 ppaauull0

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Posted 16 March 2012 - 07:58 PM

I would gladly pay out the rear end for a salt water license if it meant recreational access to some of our more impressive fish. Heck I would pay just to be allowed to fish for Tuna and Halibut on a catch and release basis.

I agree, I would support a C&R rule for Halibut and Tuna, I would also happily buy a license for the privalige to target these fish, but to ban us while the commercial guys are aloud to catch and sell these fish seems a bit backward.
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#15 Troutflyfisher

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Posted 17 March 2012 - 10:09 AM

Severel issues to address,

First, "Why is there a difference in the fishing season between the west and east side of Halifax Harbour?"
Well the best explanation I can provide is it is based on the amount of Groundfish in the area - the west (south shore) has more productive fishing grounds, thus more fish to be caught. The east less so.... this is the case with commercial fishing quotas as well... Conservation rational. The western area you are allowed 10 groundfish/day (except Halibut). The East I believe is still 5 (except Halibut). Northumberland Strait & Bras doe lakes different regs as well.
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#16 Troutflyfisher

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Posted 17 March 2012 - 10:55 AM

Secondly,

"Why is there a restriction on recreational Halibut and Tuna fishing in NS. ?"

Well I did explain the Halibut issue before - DFO needs to issue a salt water licence so the min. size (81 cm) can be enforced. The size limit used to be in regulation (and therefore could be enforced for both rec. and com. fisheries). Rec. anglers could retain 1 Halibut/day. Once it was changed (about 10-15 years or more ago), from regulation to lic, condition - the min. size limit could no longer be enforced for a rec. fisheries that was not licenced. The size limit is enforced via licence condition for commercial fishers. I have been asked before why it was changed and I do not have an answer for that.

Tuna - lots of tuna swim in our waters - Bluefin, Albacore, Bigeye and Yellowfin....the odd Skipjack as well. Only Bluefin (the largest and most coldwater tolerent), actually comes close to shore. Yes, the odd one of the others may come inshore as well. Bluefin is regulated via "ICAT" (International org.). They set quotas, size limits etc. Having seen many thousand Bluefin in the waters and many hundred caught - I can tell you they are an impressive fish. Fishing for Bluefin is strictly monitored. I do not have all the answerrs to your question of why there is not a rec. fishery - but will make some comments. Bluefin "heat up", internally quite a bit during a fight on a line and must be cooled down before being iced in the fish hold... if this is not done the meat will spoil and the value of the fish decreases. If a C&R fishery was permitted, released fish may be harmed or die if not treated properly. The Bluefin fishery is very polictical.... enough said.

The gulf region (Northumberland strait area had a C&R fishery last year,,, do not know how this worked out.

PEI does have rec-commercial tuna fishery - where you can go out and try to land a tuna, but the tuna caught belong to the com. fisher. There are some interesting legal issue with this as someone would technically requires a com. fishing licence.

There are Bluefin Tuna derbies - mostly com. fishermen/boats used.

I would like to see a rec. saltwater licence, similar to what is in B.C. would be good for tourism etc. If enough people start asking for it, it might actually happen...
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#17 Cuba Libre

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Posted 04 April 2012 - 05:04 PM

Guys-- last summer Xlobsterman and myself tried to get this board to realize that you were being screwed by the Govt and DFO when it came to access to some species of fish-- specifically Atlantic halibut, lobster and tuna.

I will say again-- you dont have to take being second rate citizens-- The fish in Canada's oceans belong to ALL Canadians. Start lobbying for your fairshare. If anyone is interested in how we just got Minister Keith Ashfield to increase the recreational share of Pacific halibut.. Let me know and I will post it.. But if you are not interested in fighting for what is yours, I wont bother.
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#18 Cuba Libre

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Posted 10 April 2012 - 12:21 PM

I would like to see a rec. saltwater licence, similar to what is in B.C. would be good for tourism etc. If enough people start asking for it, it might actually happen...

Fish Cop-- I am a retired DFO pacific biologist. 31 years service. When I started working for DFO when the dinos roamed the earth, the term "sporty" was a term of derision in DFO and amoung commercial fishermen. Sports anglers were looked upon a just a pain that got in the way of DFO doing its REAL job of taking care of the commercial fishermen. Over the years that attitude slowly changed as sportfishing got more sophisticated, and began putting LARGE amounts of money into the provincial economy, and creating thousands of jobs as the guiding and fishing lodges responded to demand and grew to the point where a recreational caught salmon was worth several times more than a commercial caught fish.

In the early 60,s the demand for input from the rec sector was so great that the Sport Fish Advisory Board was formed to provide advice to the Minister and DFO management. http://www.pac.dfo-m...ab-ccps-eng.htm We now get a say in the management of many species that are taken by both recreational fishermen as well as the commercial guys. It has not been easy as the commercial saw that as direct threat to thier livelyhood. But the SFAB was always constant that the marine resources in BC belonged to ALL Canadians... so quitcherbitching and lets work something out. It started first with salmon.. The commercials were given priority of net species that were not thought to bite on hook and line-- sockeye, chums, pinks. 95% of these fish were alotted to industry after conservation needs and First Nations Constitutional rights were met. Chinook and coho salmon, tradition hook and line species, were primarily alotted to the recreational fishery... but if a surplus occured, the commercial guys would get at them. The system has worked well-- with some fierce discussions when the policy seemed to get forgotten. To firm up this up-- DFO and the SFAB worked out a "VISION" document, that puts down what both sides expect to see in the recreational fishery. This is a document that all Maritime salt anglers would be advised to read, if you are serious about gaining a fair share of a resource that BELONGS TO ALL CANADIANS Have a look here: http://www.pac.dfo-m...-vision-eng.pdf

I wish I could say that it has solved all problems now and in the future, but our experience with DFOs and the Ministers poor decisions around halibut have show that we still have to keep on our toes to keep from getting buried in the wave of ITQs (Individual Transferable Quotas) for many species that are prized by both sectors . Things like halibut, crabs, prawns, and now even salmon... But I hope I have provided enough starter information that some of the anglers in the Maritimes may get motivated to fisgh for what is morally and legally theirs.. BTW-- you would be quite suprised to see the number of retired DFO types , and even Xcommercial fishermen that are joined together to keep recreational fishery vibrant in BC. There is room in BC for Natives, Recreational and commercial fisheries after the needs of the fish have been looked after. The scary part now, (and probably the next big fight) is the intention of the Harper government to gut the habitat section of the Fisheries Act. No habitat=no fish.
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#19 Guest

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Posted 10 April 2012 - 01:11 PM

Although a Salt water Licence has some Merit, I am afraid it would simply be another cash grab for the Government. To compare BC to that of NS is like comparing Haiti to DR, same island, but a million miles apart.

I also lived in BC, there was salt water license there when I lived there back in the 90's. It worked, however we have a vast difference from there to here.

Out in BC the two main species were Salmon and the Halibut. Sure there was other catches, however that was the main targets. Most of this done from know departure points, and a lot by Charters.

Here we have everything from Flounder to Bass, with Mackerel in between. Folks fishing off every wharf from Yarmouth to North Sydney. Would a salt water licence be enforceable with our ever dwindle DFO resources? I doubt it, therefore why bring another obstacle into play.

Regardless, seen it in action in BC, that was a totally different environment then here. The salt water industry there is geared towards the Charters, Some will deny this , however that is the way it is. There is a Charter in every bay, cove, inlet, river mouth, on the west side of the mainland and quite a few on the islands. It is all about money IMO.


Crap, the Striped Bass fisheries along our rivers can not be enforced, Some are complaining about the slaughter of Slinks, again unenforced, and you want to spread that enforcement resource further yet?

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#20 Troutflyfisher

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Posted 10 April 2012 - 03:21 PM

Although a Salt water Licence has some Merit, I am afraid it would simply be another cash grab for the Government. To compare BC to that of NS is like comparing Haiti to DR, same island, but a million miles apart.

I also lived in BC, there was salt water license there when I lived there back in the 90's. It worked, however we have a vast difference from there to here.

Out in BC the two main species were Salmon and the Halibut. Sure there was other catches, however that was the main targets. Most of this done from know departure points, and a lot by Charters.

Here we have everything from Flounder to Bass, with Mackerel in between. Folks fishing off every wharf from Yarmouth to North Sydney. Would a salt water licence be enforceable with our ever dwindle DFO resources? I doubt it, therefore why bring another obstacle into play.

Regardless, seen it in action in BC, that was a totally different environment then here. The salt water industry there is geared towards the Charters, Some will deny this , however that is the way it is. There is a Charter in every bay, cove, inlet, river mouth, on the west side of the mainland and quite a few on the islands. It is all about money IMO.


Crap, the Striped Bass fisheries along our rivers can not be enforced, Some are complaining about the slaughter of Slinks, again unenforced, and you want to spread that enforcement resource further yet?

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"Guest" raises some interesting issues...

No, Nova Scotia is not B.C.... but so what? No, Nova Scotia does not have a million charters in every port at the moment... we do not have lots of Salmon to catch in Salt Water estuaries either... but so what...? Yes comparing B.C. to the East Coast may be like comparing "Haiti to DR, same island, but a million miles apart"... true... B.C. is also 10 times bigger than the East Coast.... but these facts do not mean a Salt Water licence and increased access to our Public Resource is not a good, no great idea!!


In the Maritime Region, currently we have a Rec. Groundfish, Mackerel, Stripped Bass & Clam fishery. We have a Licenenced Rec. Scallop Fishery as well... So why not expand the Rec. Fishery to include Crabs, Lobsters, Halibut and maybe Tuna/ Swordfish etc.etc... Charter operations would spring up and increased revenues would benifit our Tourist Industry.... The purpose of a licence would be to clearly provide to the public (and better enforce), the already existing regulations in place goverening the groundfish/clam fisheries.
There are many species available for harvest in our waters. Currently Halibut (which we have large fish in our coastal waters), is unavailable to Rec. fishers because the size limit is not enforcable unless there were lic. conditions.

Guest asked, "Would a salt water licence be enforceable with our ever dwindle DFO resources? " Sure... if anything it might make the Fishery Officer's enforcement task easier... F/O's already enforce the regs. govering Rec. Fishing. There are approx. 150 F/O's in the Maritime region.

Just some points to ponder.... discussion & debate is good... I appreciate your 2 cents guest.

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